Pencil sketch of the recently-moved Cape Jourimain lighthouse

Pencil sketch of the newly-moved lighthouse at Cape Jourimain Nature Centre

Work-in-progress: pencil sketch of the newly-moved lighthouse at Cape Jourimain Nature Centre

  • Light 2H pencil under-drawing of the newly-moved lighthouse at Cape Jourimain, N.B.
  • 9 ¼ × 6 ¼″ Stillman & Birn Alpha (white/150 gsm) sketchbook.
  • From a photo I took in September, 2016.

Not sure if I want to do this as a pen-and-ink sketch or do light watercolour washes. We’ll see how I’m feeling about it once I’ve finished with the pencil.

Houses in Waterside

Watercolour sketch of houses in Waterside, New Brunswick

Watercolour sketch of houses in Waterside, New Brunswick, from a photo I took in August.

On 9 ¼ × 6 ¼″ Stillman & Birn Alpha (white/150 gsm) hard-bound sketchbook.

I did an earlier watercolour sketch of a detail of the same reference photo:

Watercolour sketch of houses in Waterside, New Brunswick

September watercolour sketch of a detail from the same photo.

The Stillman & Birn Alpha sketchbook paper is meant for light washes, but it’s just a bit too light for what I’m doing here and tends to buckle. I’m still sorting out how watercolour works, though, and while I should move on to proper blocks (I have loads), I want to get more confident with my handling of watercolour media first.

The Politics and Passions of Roger Waters [NPR interview]

I’ve been a fan of Roger Waters’ music since Pink Floyd released The Final Cut. His bleeding heart politics have always central to his music, much to the dismay of casual fans who accidentally stumble across his comments and positions in interviews.

His 2010 return of The Wall as a global concert phenomenon seemed almost self-indulgent at the time, but the shows themselves had been updated, with new visuals that underscored messages that were there in the songs all along. Looking back from late 2016, this music from 1979 seems more relevant than ever.

Eliot Porter on knowledge

Our knowledge, which we set so much store by, helps us mostly to further our exploitations, to extract from the environment what we value, and to destroy that which, in our present state of ignorance, seems to have no utility.

—Eliot Porter in Maine